New York Apple Association president Jim Allen, right of center, chats with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg during a Food Day event in Queens on Oct. 24. The mayor helped pass out New York grown apples at a subway stop.
New York Apple Association president Jim Allen, right of center, chats with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg during a Food Day event in Queens on Oct. 24. The mayor helped pass out New York grown apples at a subway stop.

The New York Apple Association enlisted Big Apple Mayor Michael Bloomberg to help hand out free apples at subway stops as part of Food Day.

With Bloomberg’s help the association handed out more than 3,500 fresh apples.

Nationwide there were more than 2,000 events spanning all 50 states for Food Day, which was organized by the Center for Science for Public Interest. The goal was to encourage Americans to eat healthy food grown in a sustainable away and to advocate smarter food policies.

The center was founded in 1971 and worked to help pass laws requiring nutrition labeling and defining the term “organic.” When David Kessler headed the food and Drug Administration he credited the center with “one of the greatest public health advances of the century” by promoting the importance of the link between diet and health to the government, industry, and the public, according to the center’s website.