Idaho is the only state to record statistically significant increases in fruit and vegetable consumption in the past decade, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In contrast, the government report said 10 states showed slight but meaningful decreases in both fruit and vegetable consumption. What's more, less than four in 10 adults are meeting government recommended dietary goals of fruit and vegetable consumption.

In a report released Sept. 10, the CDC revealed state-specific trends in fruit and vegetable consumption among adults from 2000 to 2009.

The report noted federal policy goals spelled out in Healthy People 2010 include targets of increasing to 75% the proportion of people consuming two or more servings of fruit per day and for raising the ratio of consumers who consume three or more vegetables a day to 50%.

Reality falls far short of those lofty aims. The CDC reports that in 2009 only 32.5% of U.S. adults consume fruit two or more times a day, compared with 34.4% in 2000. Of 50 states and the District of Columbia, the highest percentage of adults consuming two or more servings of fruit was in the District of Columbia (40.2%) and the lowest in Oklahoma (18.1%).

Meanwhile, just 26.3% of American adults consumed three or more vegetables per day, little changed from 2000. Tennessee had the highest percentage of adults who consumed vegetables three or more times per day (26.3%) and South Dakota had the lowest at 19.6%.

“These findings underscore the need for interventions at national, state, and community levels, across multiple settings to improve fruit and vegetable access, availability, and affordability, as a means of increasing individual consumption,” the report said.

The CDC reported 12 states and Washington D.C. reported 35% to 45% of adults who consumed fruit two or more times per day. By contrast, the CDC said no states had 35% to 45% of adults who consumed vegetables three or more times a day.

The CDC said no state met the target for either fruit or vegetable consumption.