South Florida can now claim to have the world’s largest guacamole serving.

Owners of Homestead, Fla.-based Fresh King Inc. organized the attempt to break the Guinness World Record for making the biggest tub of guacamole.


South Florida event breaks world guacamole record

Courtesy Fresh King Inc.

A team of high school students and chefs work to mix the world's largest serving of guacamole during an Oct. 11 event in Homestead, Fla.


On Oct. 11, Fresh King co-owner Peter Schnebly and a group of south Florida high school students and chefs prepared a gigantic guacamole batch that weighed 4,114 pounds, heavier than the record 4,011 pound, 12 ounce mix the Mexican Avocado Industry made in 2007 in California.

Following the California record recipe, the guacamole blend used 3,300 pounds of avocados, which amounted to 2,600 1.25-pound large Florida avocados, diced tomatoes, mayonnaise, limes and salt.

Up to 50 students and four Miami chefs helped prepare the tub of guacamole, which has yet to be certified by the Guinness organization but was certified by the state’s weights and measures division.

Schnebly, his wife and Fresh King co-owner Denisse Serge, and high school agriculture teacher Will Dukes developed the three-day “Holy Moly Redland Guacamole Celebration”  — which also featured avocado recipe competitions, food, music and dancing — to generate money for area high school culinary and agricultural programs and to increase awareness for Florida’s green skin avocados.

He said he plans to sponsor the festival annually. This year’s event attracted 1,000 people, much more than the 300-400 attendees organizers expected.

Winning avocado dishes included avocado ice cream and other avocado desserts.

“It just blew our minds,” Schnebly said. “We just knew if we gave it (the recipe contest) to these world-famous chefs, they would come up with something we didn’t expect.”

Schnebly also wants to use funds generated by the event to start a culinary institute in the Redlands area of Homestead and Florida City to train south Florida high school and college students.