The redbay ambrosia beetle spreads the fungal disease laurel wilt among avocado and related trees..
The redbay ambrosia beetle spreads the fungal disease laurel wilt among avocado and related trees..

Avocado fruit or seeds from infected trees don't pose a risk in spreading the fungal disease laurel wilt.

Those are the findings of a University of Florida research group, according to a news release.

Randy Ploetz, a plant pathology professor at the university's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, led the work that examined transmission of Raffaelea lauricola, the fungus responsible for laurel wilt.

The pathogen does not colonize avocado fruit.

In addition, the redbay ambrosia beetle—the insect that spreads the disease—does not infest the fruit.

"Without the beetle, the chances of transmission are extremely remote," Ploetz said in the release.

Instead, the pest dwells in the tree's xylem, or water- and nutrient-transmitting tissue.

The findings mean that Florida avocados and seeds are unlikely to transmit laurel wilt when shipped to other U.S. states or foreign countries, according to the release.