Amelia Freidline, Fresh Take
Amelia Freidline, Fresh Take

It’s January again, and you know what that means — the holiday shopping craze has been replaced by a postholiday rush to lose the inches too many sugar cookies added to our respective waistlines.

It’s January again, and you know what that means — the holiday shopping craze has been replaced by a postholiday rush to lose the inches too many sugar cookies added to our respective waistlines.
Not that that’s a bad thing.
I’ve received pamphlets in my mailbox offering me discounted membership rates to local fitness centers.
Online, under the banner “A New Year, A New You,” I’ve seen ads for more gyms — and also low-calorie cocktails.
Now that’s a weight-loss method I hadn’t thought of before.
In all seriousness, though, this is an opportune time for the produce industry to capitalize on consumers’ renewed interest in healthy eating.
People can get intimidated by too much change at once, though, so suggest simple diet alterations they can make to incorporate more fresh fruits and vegetables.
One of the winners of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate video contest did a great job illustrating this. When her sons usually had a snack of potato chips, a mom substituted grapes instead (watch the videos at fruitsandveggieschallenge.gov).
That’s a little change, but it’s a step in the right direction.
A mid-December study from the NPD Group (http://ow.ly/8ibZa) said the average consumer consumes meals that follow MyPlate guidelines about seven days a year.
Half a plate of what?
I was at a conference recently where our meals were catered by the convention center.
Each time we sat down to eat I was surprised to find a meat- and starch-dominated menu with relatively few vegetables involved.
Forget half a plate of produce — this was half a plate of pork chop.
The kids’ menu was more disappointing, with one meal featuring Tater Tots, a cookie and a cheeseburger as big as a 3-year-old’s face. No fresh produce.
Given the NPD Group’s findings, however, I’m beginning to suspect this is the way most Americans eat.
It’s about time we all relearned how to eat healthfully.
What are you doing to help?
What's your take? Leave a comment and tell us your opinionIt’s January again, and you know what that means — the holiday shopping craze has been replaced by a postholiday rush to lose the inches too many sugar cookies added to our respective waistlines.

Not that that’s a bad thing.

I’ve received pamphlets in my mailbox offering me discounted membership rates to local fitness centers.

Online, under the banner “A New Year, A New You,” I’ve seen ads for more gyms — and also low-calorie cocktails.

Now that’s a weight-loss method I hadn’t thought of before.

In all seriousness, though, this is an opportune time for the produce industry to capitalize on consumers’ renewed interest in healthy eating.

People can get intimidated by too much change at once, though, so suggest simple diet alterations they can make to incorporate more fresh fruits and vegetables.

One of the winners of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate video contest did a great job illustrating this. When her sons usually had a snack of potato chips, a mom substituted grapes instead (watch the videos here).

That’s a little change, but it’s a step in the right direction.

A mid-December study from the NPD Group said the average consumer consumes meals that follow MyPlate guidelines about seven days a year.

Half a plate of what?

I was at a conference recently where our meals were catered by the convention center.

Each time we sat down to eat I was surprised to find a meat- and starch-dominated menu with relatively few vegetables involved.

Forget half a plate of produce — this was half a plate of pork chop.

The kids’ menu was more disappointing, with one meal featuring Tater Tots, a cookie and a cheeseburger as big as a 3-year-old’s face. No fresh produce.

Given the NPD Group’s findings, however, I’m beginning to suspect this is the way most Americans eat.

It’s about time we all relearned how to eat healthfully.

What are you doing to help?

afreidline@thepacker.com

What's your take? Leave a comment and tell us your opinion.