We know that consumers increasingly want to know where their food comes from.
The trend presents a good opportunity for fresh produce growers to show consumers that they’re real farmers with real land and crops, not a Big Ag monster as portrayed by some activists.
On first glance, McDonald’s new promotional campaign “Supplier Stories” seems to tap into this consumer desire and present this opportunity to fruit and vegetable suppliers. 
TV ads began appearing this year showing growers and ranchers, including a Salinas, Calif., lettuce shipper. The burger firm has a link on its website featuring longer video versions.
Except, we’re not lovin’ it. 
A consumer who really wants to know where McDonald’s ingredients come from is sure to be disappointed with the effort. 
A mere three of the thousands of suppliers is all they’ll get, and they’ll see heavily stylized and firmly controlled supplier stories.
The featured lettuce grower, Dirk Giannini, partner in Christensen & Giannini, could not speak to us because he said McDonald’s would not allow him to.
A McDonald’s spokeswoman said the chain isn’t releasing other suppliers’ names.
The fast-food giant has made so many successful marketing moves recently, including the well-received expansion of its fresh-cut apple program in Happy Meals, it’s strange to experience such a letdown from “Supplier Stories.”
If McDonald’s really wants to promote supplier stories and tell consumers where their food comes from, such a half-hearted effort may do more harm than good.
One can’t help but think, what does McDonald’s have to hide?
Did The Packer get it right? Leave a comment and tell us your opinion.

 

We know that consumers increasingly want to know where their food comes from.

The trend presents a good opportunity for fresh produce growers to show consumers that they’re real farmers with real land and crops, not a Big Ag monster as portrayed by some activists.

On first glance, McDonald’s new promotional campaign “Supplier Stories” seems to tap into this consumer desire and present this opportunity to fruit and vegetable suppliers. 

TV ads began appearing this year showing growers and ranchers, including a Salinas, Calif., lettuce shipper. The burger firm has a link on its website featuring longer video versions.

Except, we’re not lovin’ it. 

A consumer who really wants to know where McDonald’s ingredients come from is sure to be disappointed with the effort. 

A mere three of the thousands of suppliers is all they’ll get, and they’ll see heavily stylized and firmly controlled supplier stories.

The featured lettuce grower, Dirk Giannini, partner in Christensen & Giannini, could not speak to us because he said McDonald’s would not allow him to.

A McDonald’s spokeswoman said the chain isn’t releasing other suppliers’ names.

The fast-food giant has made so many successful marketing moves recently, including the well-received expansion of its fresh-cut apple program in Happy Meals, it’s strange to experience such a letdown from “Supplier Stories.”

If McDonald’s really wants to promote supplier stories and tell consumers where their food comes from, such a half-hearted effort may do more harm than good.

One can’t help but think, what does McDonald’s have to hide?

Did The Packer get it right? Leave a comment and tell us your opinion.