(Aug. 23) In all trade, it’s said, there are winners and losers. That’s true.

And it’s clearly the case with the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Winners? Well, consumers of fresh fruits and vegetables have enjoyed lower prices and increased availability of many products since NAFTA was implemented by the U.S., Mexico and Canada in 1994.

And Mexican exports of fresh produce have grown dramatically under the free trade accord. In 1993, the year before NAFTA took effect, Mexican exports of fresh produce to the U.S. were valued at $1.161 billion, according to statistics from the U.S.

Department of Agriculture. In 2003, the exports to the U.S. were valued at $2.692 billion, an increase of more than 131%.

During that same time, U.S. exports of fresh produce to its southern neighbor rose from $98 million to $267 million, an increase of 172%. While the dollar figure of U.S. exports pales in comparison with that of Mexico, the same could be said of 1993’s disparity.

And the statistics demonstrate that there have been winners in the produce industry on both sides of the border.

Have there been losers? Without a doubt.

The same can be said in the day-to-day competition any business faces. In all business, as in all trade, there are winners and losers.

The growth in fresh produce trade between the U.S. and Mexico since the advent of NAFTA has created opportunities for business victories in each country.
Just check the figures.